Question of Atheist Scruples – you become a man of BUSINESS

Fuck, I love the Muppets’ Christmas Carol. I don’t care what time of year it is, I can watch it over and over.

So, this round’s Question of Atheist Scruples:

You’ve agreed verbally to a business deal when you get a much better offer. Do you back out of the deal?

Ouch. If my ambition is just to get ahead, no matter what the cost, then yes, I’d take the better offer. If my ambition is to create successful long-term business relations regardless of profit potential, then no.

What kind of person am I?

It is only verbal. No contracts have been signed on either side. The traditional gentleman’s agreement, even though I’m a woman.

That said, I’d be a rotten person to turn my back on this person and go for what looks like the better deal.

Libra libra libra, sucks to be a libra…

I think I’d still stand by the original agreement, even if the payoff is less. I’d rather be respected than rich.

Popular films capitalizing on business deals, nefarious or otherwise:

Risky Business — Tom Cruise plays Joel, a well-off young adult who wants more sex than sense and a call girl walks off with a family jewel. His solution to many problems is a brothel run from his own home. Good thinking…

Indecent Proposal — A millionaire offers a couple some money to sleep with the wife. Cool beans, although should one’s intimacy really be for sale in such a way?

The Telegraph had a post this year listing the best films about business and throws Wizard of Oz on it. Why?

The Wizard of Oz (1939) Dorothy’s journey along the yellow brick road to the Emerald City (what colour is money, again?) is believed by some to be an allegory of American monetary politics at the turn of the 20th century.

Ah, yes. I’d read into that before. Interesting ideas.

You’ve Got Mail also gets listed there. A revamp of Shop Around the Corner but adorable because Tom Hanks and Meg Ryan are fun together all of the time. A lonely small bookstore owner (Ryan) is overwhelmed by the giant bookmonster store moving in nearby. She’s involved in an online chat/email with a sweet fellow, thus falling in love with the owner of that monstrosity (Hanks). Hanks knows who she is, though, and she’s foolish not to realize sooner that he’s the reason her shop’s nearly doomed. All works out in the end, I think, though, because those shows usually do.

The Devil Wears Prada is there, too. I was largely disappointed by that film. I never read the book but I still hoped that Anne Hathaway’s character would have seen fashion for the sham it was, regardless of the terrific monologue Meryl Streep’s character provides about how the runway predicts fashion choices for all wage levels and is thus super important. I just recall finding myself wishing she’d seen through the bullshit and quit the work at the magazine for some other kind of job.

Thoughts? Are you in a business? Do you wonder about decisions getting made and whether they best benefit those working, or those in charge?

Advertisements

Comments are closed.

%d bloggers like this: