Creationism isn’t science. It will never be science.

It doesn’t matter how many people want to see Creationism in the science classroom, it’s never going to belong there. Unfortunately, a recent teacher’s survey in Britain found that nearly a third of them would like it to be.

Of the 1,200 questioned, 53 per cent thought that creationism should not be taught in science lessons, while 29 per cent thought it should. However, 88 per cent agreed that if pupils raised the issue in a science lesson, they should be allowed to discuss it.

Discussion I can deal with, so long as the discussion starts with, “Creationism will never be science and these are the reasons why…” and then list a pile of reasons why it doesn’t qualify.

Top comment on the screen when I saw the article is from Robert in Lincoln:

I’ve read that this survey could be accessed by anyone, not just teachers. So it’s pretty much meaningless as it is possible that the survey was mentioned to one or more christian groups and they decided to enter their opinion on the matter.

Besides, only science teachers should have been asked.

If that’s true, the survey is pretty much useless as a gauge on how teachers think. I think he also makes a valid point about limiting the survey to those who’d have the creation questions asked in class.

Richard from Croydon offers up a criticism:

I can’t see the point of adopting a triumphalist attitude vis a vis Darwinian evolution if all that it is going to personally offer you is a few years on a planet as some kind of mutated monkey. You can’t see the abhorrent connotations? Continue gleefully on.

Yes, I love being a mutated monkey. I’m not embarrassed to admit my ancestors were literal tree huggers. I think humanity should be looking back at where we started and saying, “Isn’t evolution amazing? I wonder when we’ll notice the next step. Where will the future of our species go?”

Instead we get groups of people who want to believe, are desperate to believe that how we are today is how we’ve always been because we’re in the image of a god they themselves have mutated and redesigned to fit the present way of thinking about a god.

Yes, I know that was a run-on sentence but when a passion for a topic strikes it happens.

Anyway, Creationism is a waste of brain power and those who wish to believe it is fact are denying themselves a very rich and vibrant history that science is still working to unravel. I doubt they’ll ever be done.

Maybe creationists hug their bibles so tight because deep down they know science is winning on this issue and they’re scared of being wrong. Scared to have to admit once and for all that their security blanket can’t protect them from the reality of history any more than a marshmallow would.

It burns to quote the bible now of all moments, but sometimes a person has to fight dirty:

When I was a child, I spake as a child, I understood as a child, I thought as a child: but when I became a man, I put away childish things.

1 Corinthians 13:11

Leave the stories on the bedside table and put away the childish things. It’s long past due.


Edit for new content: whydontyou.org.uk has a good article on this topic.

About 1minionsopinion

Canadian Atheist Basically ordinary Library employee Avid book lover Ditto for movies Wanna-be writer Procrastinator
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2 Responses to Creationism isn’t science. It will never be science.

  1. heather says:

    Thanks for the comment on whydontyou.

    I reckon you covered this really well. (I never considered whether they’d actually got responses from non-teachers. D’oh.)

    I really like this paragraph:
    “Yes, I love being a mutated monkey. I’m not embarrassed to admit my ancestors were literal tree huggers. I think humanity should be looking back at where we started and saying, “Isn’t evolution amazing? I wonder when we’ll notice the next step. Where will the future of our species go?””

    The real world is quite wonderful enough, you’d think, but it must seem empty to some people, so they fill it with childish dreams, as you say.

  2. Pingback: Teaching “the controversy”, again » Why Dont You Blog?

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